Great Books Groups and Events

Great Books provides a lifelong program of self-education. If you like to share your ideas and enjoy being challenged, shared inquiry will work for you.

There are vacation programs (institutes) as well as councils to steer you to individual groups in various locations. If you cannot find a convenient group, think about starting one and either contact the Great Book Foundation or one of the councils. If you already belong to a book group, you might consider the shared inquiry method and becoming a part of the Great Books Discussion Program. Check out the list of local Great Books groups in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware areas.

Great Books Discussion Groups

In 1947 Robert Maynard Hutchins and Mortimer Adler established the Great Books Foundation to give all people an opportunity to join in conversation of our basic beliefs and ideas through reading and discussion. This was the beginning of the Great Books Program, an affiliate of the Great Books Foundation, a nonprofit educational corporation that now has councils, institutes, and discussion groups across this country and abroad.

The Great Books Program combines:
The opportunity to read books you have always wanted to read and never seemed to have the time for, with a method called Shared Inquiry.
Shared inquiry is a discussion process that enables participants who have carefully read the same work to help each other explore and understand the work.
A leader provides questions that challenge the participants to think for themselves. The conversation allows participants to share their perspectives and respond to the interpretations of others; it uncovers new and deeper meanings for everyone engaged in this dialogue. It is a method that works, that is exciting, and fun. Read more about Shared Inquiry...

The Tricorn

An Auspicious Event:
It has finally come to reality -- an idea and hope that has lain dormant in the we-ought-to stage for a long time.
Thus begins the first Tricorn article - Editor Norma Oser

In Memory of Norma Oser


















See more at GreatBooksDiscussionPrograms.org.